Wellen Stretch Chore Coat

The chore coat seems to be the new hot outerwear item this Fall. I’ve been wearing the Wellen Stretch Chore Coat for a few months now, with a lot of wear recently with the cooler weather.

Material

This jacket is a lighter hemp canvas made from 66% organic cotton, 32% hemp, 2% spandex.

The texture looks like a tough canvas, but the hand-feel is quite soft since it is garment washed. The 2% spandex adds a slightly noticeable stretch while the hemp adds strength and breathability.

Overall, this seems like it will be a long-wearing, casual fabric.

Fit & Style

The jacket is listed as a “tailored, athletic cut” as well as a “Classic workwear silhouette made with sustainable materials you can feel good about wearing”. I’d put it more towards that tailored cut. I ended up with a XL, which is listed as a 48” chest (I have a 44” chest). It has room for layering with a heavy flannel, but wouldn’t fit something bulky like a hoodie. So if you want to wear this over a thick insulation layer, size up.

Style-wise this is fully casual workwear. Something that can look good with a flannel and boots, but not something that you are going to dress up or wear to an office job. The patch pockets and shank buttons work well with the style.

Performance

The performance is in the hemp content of the fabric. When I first got this jacket, it was still warm out, but the jacket was comfortable even in the 60s (ºF) — the hemp makes it quite breathable. I could even see this being a shirt to throw on over a t-shirt in the summer when you need some extra protection. While I haven’t abused it yet, the fabric seems like it will hold up quite well to the abrasion of using it for woodworking or the like.

The stretch content is not very noticeable in the hand, I don’t feel my motion ever being restricted, so it must be doing something since the cut is a bit tailored. Likely the splits at the side seams also help when the jacket is buttoned.

The pockets are what make a chore coat have its unique style and functionality. Here the lower two patch pockets are dual-entry, meaning you can store something in the top opening, while having a side opening available to warm your hands. There also is a generous interior chest pocket for something like a phone or wallet and an exterior chest pocket.

The functioning sleeve buttons also add to the performance, allowing you to easily roll up the sleeves

Overall

The Stretch Chore Coat from Wellen is a worthy contender in the sea of chore coats that have been coming out for the Fall. The lighter weight but durable fabric makes it a very versatile piece. A great option if you are going for a comfortable and casual chore coat or something you want to do heavy work in. Currently on sale for $75 ($128 retail price), it is a great deal. Recommended.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Wellen Stretch Chore Coat

Pistol Lake All-Around Shorts

Note: These shorts were provided free of charge by Pistol Lake for review.

I’ve been wearing Pistol Lake since they released their Minimalist Tee (our review). They recently updated their All-Around Shorts, taking into account customer feedback, and I was excited to give them a try as they looked like a good combination of workout and casual shorts (more on this later).

Material

These shorts are made from a 90% nylon/10% spandex blend with four-way stretch and a DWR coating. Weighing in at 213 gsm, it is a substantial fabric, but the weight doesn’t take away from the comfort, it simply adds to the durability.

There is no technical sheen here, and minimal texture — the fabric just blends in.

The inside of the fabric does have more of a texture with very low loops, making it feel comfortable against the skin.

Unfortunately, there is some “technical swoosh” while walking. It did tone down some with washing, but I don’t expect it to ever go completely away.

Fit & Style

The fit is great. It is slightly tailored to help make the shorts more versatile, but not so much that they don’t work for exercise. The size chart is spot on (just remember that the waist measurements are actual and not vanity sizing). The 9” inseam works well for me and is a nice middle ground for versatile shorts.

As I mentioned in the intro, these fall more into the exercise shorts that look great around town vs. the great looking shorts that you can exercise in (like Outlier New Ways (our review)).

I’ve both worn these out of the house and for working out, and think they do well in both situations. They are certainly a step above gym shorts for casual wear, but remain casual.

The only negatives to the style are the lack of a button (they are elastic waist) and the pocket flare. Pistol Lake did reduce pocket flare with the 2.0 variant, but it’s still there for me, especially on the right side pocket where the cell phone pouch is located.

Performance

These shorts perform well. They stay out of the way, don’t bind, and don’t soak up sweat or get clammy. They seem breathable, but I wasn’t able to test them in hot weather.

Being elastic waistband, I’m glad they don’t have an external draw string, but found it strange there was not an internal one. While I didn’t feel like I needed a drawstring, it always is a nice addition on these shorts that are designed to be worn anywhere.

Pistol Lake also included their secure phone pocket, here as a snap secure pocket inside the right front pocket.

They “reshaped pocket bags so they fall toward the middle/outer part of the thigh” for the 2.0 version, and I think the pockets are great — nice and deep without allowing your phone or other larger objects to fall over/twist. There also is a nice back pocket, adding to the feel of them not just being workout shorts.

Overall

Pistol Lake did a great job making a pair of shorts that can be versatile. At a price point of $74, they represent a good value. Much cheaper than the New Ways and not too much more than a workout only pair of shorts.

The only caveats are the noise and slight pocket flare, but I don’t think that detracts from the value enough to not recommend these shorts. While not the best out there, they are certainly worth a look, especially at the price.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Pistol Lake All-Around Shorts

Fisher + Baker Everyday Cashmere Short Sleeve Crew

Note: this item was sent free of charge for review.

I’ll admit, I was skeptical of this shirt when Fisher + Baker reached out to see if we would be interested in looking at their clothing. All of it looks very nice, but cashmere + polyester — can that be better than some of the merino wool we normally test and wear? Why not though, learn something new every day. The pitch for this shirt is simple: “You deserve to wear cashmere, Everyday.”

Sounded fancy, so I’m in.

Materials

This shirt actually has a really interesting blend: 88% drirelease® Polyester and 12% Cashmere Wool. I have experience with both fabrics on their own, but never together. The combination of both makes the entire unit machine washable as well.

The entire shirt is luxuriously soft.

And I don’t mean that in a ‘soft for wool’ way. I mean it is soft. The hand feel is soft. Against your skin, soft. Against your face, soft. It feels like a soft cashmere blended with your most washed and loved cotton t-shirt — and yeah it feels great. It’s a heavy material, I would peg it around 170+gsm but not more than 200gsm. It’s thick so there is a nice drape and a substantial feel to it.

Performance

Ok, Fisher + Baker claims:

  • Fast Drying: I would say it is faster than cotton by a large margin, but not quite as fast as thinner fully synthetic or merino wool shirts. I have no complaints, it will dry overnight without issue.
  • Breathable: I thought this would fail on this front, but it doesn’t. It’s not the most breathable shirt I own, but it’s on par with most of my merino wool t-shirts and did decently in heat where the “feels like” was spiking to 105°F. Again, on par with merino wool — which is to say: well done.
  • Odor Control: better than cotton, but not as good as pure merino wool. You can get a couple days out of it, but it’s not the most odor resistant. This does bring up one other small odor related thing: this shirt smells funky when you pull it from the washer. Very wet-wool smell. This goes away quickly as the shirt dries, but do note this.
  • Easy to Care For: So, they say machine washable. They sent it to me to test, and as part of the packaging it came with some wool detergent. Seems like they would prefer you use wool detergent. But I wouldn’t know because I don’t read instructions well and Steve didn’t tell me not to do harmful things to the shirt, so I just washed it with all my other stuff in normal detergent. I hang dry all my shirts already, and I did the same here. The shirt survived it all, and it should, as drirelease has been very durable with my other shirts made from it. I didn’t detect any shrink or outright damage. I’ve washed it nearly 8 times now, and all I can see is minor fuzziness on the fabric. So, check.

To sum up the performance of this shirt, I would peg it at: above average. If you wash your clothing daily to begin with, you’ll find the performance great, but if you want the most wears out of your t-shirts then you could find more odor resistant options. Generally it performed far better than I expected and in line with the claims.

Fit and Style

I normally write this before the performance section, but thought it was best after. Because there are two aspect to this shirt: first it looks stellar. Second it is cut really well, and also cut in a way where it moves well too.

I tend to find most t-shirts either a little boxy, or a little to form fitting. Fisher + Baker really nailed this cut. There’s not annoying rub from any seams, they aren’t in the way of even shoulder straps, and the entire shirt just fits me very well.

As for style, it’s a t-shirt. A nice t-shirt, but still a t-shirt.

Overall

When I wrote up the review about Outlier’s Ultrafine Merino T, I ended it by saying “these are the most luxurious feeling shirts I’ve ever owned.” That statement is now obsolete. Those are the best merino shirts I have ever seen.

But the Fisher + Baker Everyday Cashmere Short Sleeve Crew is easily the most luxurious feeling shirts I’ve ever owned, while still performing well. At $98, yeah, these should be top of your list.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Fisher + Baker Everyday Cashmere Short Sleeve Crew

Lululemon ABC Pant Classic Warpstreme

Lululemon has had their ABC line of mens’ pants around for a while, and they are widely talked about on the travel/one bag Reddit community. A long ways back I tried on some in a store and was not super impressed, but decided to finally give them a try with their new “Warpstreme” fabric.

Specifically, I tried the ABC Pant Classic Warpstreme.

Material

These pants are made with Lululemon’s four-way stretch Warpstreme fabric, which is 100% polyester. It is heavier than I’d have expected and is smooth and has minimal texture.

While walking, these pants do make noise, and especially in bright light, they have a sheen that gives them away as technical — no mistaking these for your standard chinos.

Performance

Quite a few claims are made about these pants, so I’ll go through each:

  • Shape retention: seems to be there, haven’t had any bagging out between washes, remains to be seen how this holds up long term. I’m guessing some of this comes because there is no elastane to stretch/wear out.
  • Quick-drying: these dry about as expected for heavier polyester pants. Nothing magic, but will dry overnight.
  • Four-way stretch: yep, these are stretchy. Not the stretchiest I’ve tried, but very comfortable.
  • Breathable: in the summer heat and humidity, I didn’t find these very comfortable, so I’d challenge this feature.
  • Wrinkle resistant: yep, no wrinkles, ready to wear right from the washer.
  • Feels smooth & falls softly away from the body: not sure this is a positive, but true.

The performance features are rounded out by a crotch gusset, a nicely done hidden zipper in the right back pocket, and reflective tape inside the outside seams that is visible when the pant leg is rolled up, for bicycle commuters.

Fit & Style

These pants come in both a “Classic” and “Slim” cut. I have the Classic variation, and I’d say it fits straight with room in the seat and thighs, all while not being baggy. The fit works well for me and the style is classic five-pocket.

With no-to-minimal break, you wouldn’t ID these as technical fabric, but the drape seems like it could be off if you prefer more break. The sheen and noise, however, do give these away. While the sheen isn’t noticeable in normal indoor light, it really shows in the sun or harsh lighting.

The final straw to keep these pants from blending in is the seam across the back of the knee, these typically are added to very technical pants to keep the pants from binding when you bend your knee. It is disappointing that Lululemon decided to add these here, as with four-way stretch, they shouldn’t be needed.

I purchased the “Obsidian” color, which I expected to be grey (as it looks in the Lululemon website photos), but it turned out to be a blue-grey, leaning towards the blue side.

Overall

These pants retail for $128, and I don’t think they are worth that price. There are numerous other pants we’ve reviewed that fit in this category (high stretch but good looks) that are better (Olivers Passage Pant, Western Rise Diversion Pant, Aether Kelso Pant).

If you live somewhere where it’s hard (or expensive) to get our other picks, these aren’t bad, but wait for a good sale.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Lululemon ABC Pant Classic Warpstreme

Lululemon Airing Easy Short Sleeve Shirt Ventlight Mesh

What a name, essentially this is a short sleeved button down shirt. The claims to fame for it are the stretch and breathability — which seems to be granted via Ventlight Mesh. Essentially this is a series of micro mesh holes throughout the fabric and is common for both Lululemon and even Under Armour to employ in a bid to increase breathability. The specific patter I bought is out of stock, but there are others here.

I’ve actually been testing this shirt for some time, and while nice, it is hard to justify over other options on the market which all have better performance.

Material

First, you need to know that this is a thicker shirt, which is counter intuitive given how it is framed. But the material is hard to describe as anything other than thick — so if you are tired of shirts being thin so they wear cool, hey you are in luck on this one. The composition is 96% Polyester, 4% Xtra life lycra® elastane. I have no cares about what Xtra life Lycra is — let’s just assume it is somehow a better variant of Lycra.

That’s not all there is to the material, and Lululemon makes really no mention of this. But there is a series of holes throughout the fabric in a grid pattern. Ostensibly to improve breathability. But you can and do see these holes in the fabric — even on Lululemon product page. They are very apparent on solid colors or lighter colored fabric. The pattern I have hides them somewhat well, but they exist.

The hand feel is a soft, with a slightly but spongey feeling. It is weird. It’s not ideal. It feels very technical.

Fit & Style

A classic short sleeve button up, with removable collar stays, a funky pattern and a funky material — this is a casual weekend shirt that you could do some yard work in. I’ve been wearing it while working from home, as well as barbecuing in the Houston heat and hanging by the pool.

The fit is great, but the style is meh at best. A firmly casual shirt with a collar that perhaps sits a little too perky to blend seamlessly in with a good casual look. Almost a touch preppy with the collar.

Overall I would classify the fit as good, and the style as ambivalent casual.

Performance

So this shirt boasts quick a few performance claims, I’ll just go through each of those first:

  • Stretch: yes, this is a very stretchy garment. But the value of this is somewhat limited in a short sleeved shirt not made to be tucked in. That said, this shirt will never restrict your movement.
  • Quick Drying: it is decently fast to try. The material is a little thicker so that detracts a bit, but when tossing it back on after taking a swim, the shirt dried quick enough to never be a problem. Quick enough drying for me.
  • Wrinkle Resistance: it’s not that it has no wrinkles after washing, it’s that the wrinkles it does have are so hard to see it doesn’t matter. I’d say yes, holds up to the claim on this.
  • Breathability: I don’t think so. For as crazy as this shirt is with all the mesh like holes, it doesn’t breath all that well. There are a lot better options out there. Does it breath? Yes. Does it breath well compared to other shirts in this category? Lower end.

I’ll also note that this shirt is very durable feeling and I think you could probably spend a lot of time wearing this shirt with little annoyance. For my needs it is slightly below average on performance.

Conclusion

The shirt retails for $98, and I wouldn’t advise paying that for the shirt. If you find it on sale, or get a discount somewhere around the sub-$70 range then I think it is a solid buy. It will not wow you, but it is easy to wear and comfortable enough that it is hard to really complain about.

That said, the Western Rise AirLight (our review) is a vastly better shirt any way you slice it.

Not a bad shirt, wait for a really good sale.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Lululemon Airing Easy Short Sleeve Shirt Ventlight Mesh

Jungmaven Baja Tee

Jungmaven focuses on hemp-forward, casual apparel, and has been at it since the early 90s. The founder is a founding member of the industry association that helped make growing hemp legal again in the US. They are now working on helping to increase production and build the infrastructure to knit hemp in the US.

When I saw this mission and how long they’ve had to perfect the hemp tee, I grabbed their Baja Tee to try during a sale about a month ago.

Material

The fabric is a mid-weight 7 oz. 55% hemp/45% organic cotton blend. This is the fabric they started with and I think it shows. The weight (they compare an average cotton tee at 5 oz.) makes it substantial and gives it a natural drape and handfeel.

Being a majority hemp blend, the fabric does have a slightly rough look to it, making it casual without looking worn out or sloppy. Hemp also gets softer with each wash while still remaining strong, making it a great choice for a casual shirt.

Performance

This t-shirt performs much better than its weight. Typically a 7 oz. fabric would be too warm for the summer, but with the breathability and moisture wicking of the hemp, this shirt remained comfortable, even on days into the 90s °F. The heavier weight also makes it nice when moving in and out of air conditioning, as it seems to keep that “AC chill” away.

As discussed by Jungmaven, hemp also has antibacterial properties and sheds dirt more readily than other materials. I found these claims to be true, as I got at least 3-5 wears out of the shirt between each wash.

The only area where this shirt is lacking is in its’ drying ability. When it gets wet, it takes a long while to dry. While the breathability keeps me dry while wearing it, when I got stuck in a rainstorm, I had to change shirts when I got home.

Fit and Style

This shirt has a great fit that I think is coming back in style, it is a little boxy and shorter than most of my XL tees, but in a good way.

The fit combined with the fabric makes puts it solidly in the casual category. The natural drape and classic look keep it looking good (and much better than a workout tee for those work from home video calls).

Overall

The Baja Tee has been my most worn t-shirt since I got it at the beginning of August. The weight and style make it perfect for working from home and around town. I think it will continue to get a lot of wear into the Fall, due to the great weight.

Highly recommended, and if you like something a lighter, there also is a 5 oz. fabric in the same blend.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Jungmaven Baja Tee

Western Rise Session Tee

Note: this item was sent by Western Rise at no cost.

Along with the Movement Shorts (our review), I have been testing Western Rise’s new Session Tee which is made for active/workouts and is first and foremost made to be light and breathable. It is all those things and then some, let’s dive in.

Material

At first it seemed like this fabric might be at least 10% Magic, but Western Rise lists it as: 100% Deltapeak™ Polyester coming in as an 88 gsm mesh double-knit fabric. 88gsm. That’s insanely light, and in practice that’s what makes it feel like magic because it isn’t see-through or paper thin, it is amazingly light.

In addition to weighing nothing, the material itself has a very soft hand feel, and makes no noise at all. I am a huge fan of this fabric.

Fit & Style?

This is an active shirt, so style is dead on with active, I guess. The shirt has an athletic fit, and my standard size large fit me nicely.

The bottom of the shirt has rounded corners, and gives it a bit of a unique look, instead of just a straight across hem common in many active shirts. Overall, a good solid athletic style for an athletic shirt.

Performance

So, let me be clear about how I have been testing this: I’ve been wearing this while rucking with my super abrasive GORUCK Rucker, and doing that in the August heat of Houston, which has consistently been about 90°F, and add about another 10°F to that for the “feels like” with the humidity. In other words: I have been testing in this in hot and humid weather, and been sweating in it a lot, while also grinding the material against 1000D Cordura.

Most of the shirts I test like this, fail quickly.

That has not been the case here. So let me bullet this out:

  • Breathability: I own no other shirt as breathable and as comfortable as this shirt is to wear when I work out. Every other shirt I have causes me to build up sweat faster than this shirt under nearly identical situations. This shirt excels for this.
  • Moisture Control: it does get wet, yes, but it dries insanely fast. I have not yet had to toss this in the drier, because you pull it out of the washer and it is nearly ready to wear, hang it, and it’s dry faster than the next time I come to check on it. Even with sweat, it is almost like the shirt hates being wet, and starts drying as soon as you give it a chance to.
  • Odor Resistance: look, given the amount of sweat I have put in this shirt, I have yet to smell any odor, but I have also not been trying to wear it multiple times. There’s little to no need — it dries too fast after washing to not wash it. But I do think it resists odors well, as many of my other active shirts will have smells even after one hard workout in them — this shirt never smelled.
  • Durability: as I mentioned, GORUCK bags on workout shirts can be a death sentence of pilling for shirts. Not so with this one. It shows zero signs of wear. I am shocked.

As I implied at the start of this review, this shirt performs very well.

Overall

I love this shirt, and while $68 might seem steep for an active wear t-shirt, I can assure you it is worth every penny. I’d like to own more, and hope that they expand the color range. I have the Ash color and love it, I’d love more colors — but truthfully you only need one of these, even if you work out daily. Ok, two would make life a touch easier.

So I guess I am saying you should buy two of these.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Western Rise Session Tee

Western Rise Spectrum Jogger

Note: these were provided by Western Rise at no cost for review.

When Western Rise launched their new Active Collection, I was excited to see the Spectrum Jogger, as I was already thinking that I needed another pair of joggers going into Fall.

Joggers are something that can easily go too far in the fashion or comfort directions, but Western Rise hit the sweet spot with these pants. Performant for exercise while still looking great.

Material

The joggers are made from a 100% polyester, warp-knit, four-way mechanical stretch fabric with a C6 DWR from Toray in Japan. It weighs in at 220 gsm, so it is substantial.

What does that all mean? The hand feel is soft like a knit fabric, but it is thicker and more durable like a woven. The DWR helps repel water and stains. All while having a firm stretch so they can move with you.

This is the perfect material for a jogger.

Performance

Being a warm summer, I hadn’t had a chance to give these pants much of a try until we had an early morning in the 50s (°F). I wore these for a run and I was impressed by the performance. Typically, I don’t wear pants for exercise until its into the 40s but these pants breath so well they remained comfortable. I was expecting to get too hot, but never got there. That in its own is enough for me to get excited about them.

They also never seemed to pick up much sweat, absorbing and releasing the moisture quite quickly. This is also beneficial when washing, as they air dry quickly.

The mechanical stretch, while firm, is surprisingly forgiving even with the modern fit. I never felt the pants binding or restricting my motion running or stretching.

Fit & Style

The fit here is great. It’s a modern cut, which for me means that there is enough room for my thighs, with a taper from the knee down, keeping them from being too big around my calves or ankles. This is a solution I prefer to the typical elastic ankle cuff you see on many joggers.

I found the design of the elastic waist to be top notch, as it never felt too tight or too loose where I needed to use the drawstring (which ends with a small knot secured by shrink tubing).

This fit combined with the fabric make these look great for around town on the weekend.

A few other touches include a zipper pocket hidden in the side seam that’s a good size for keys, and a zippered back pocket for your wallet.

Overall

These are a great entry into the jogger space, and have earned a top spot in my closet. They can easily go from a workout or hike to coffee or hanging out on the weekend. I’m excited to see how these perform as the weather cools off, as they seem like they will have a wide comfort range.

Highly recommended.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Western Rise Spectrum Jogger

Western Rise Movement Short

Note: these were provided free for review.

Living in Houston can quickly make you appreciate a good pair of workout shorts, and also quickly exposes the shorts that are more hype than performant. When Western Rise let us know they had new active wear coming out, I personally could not wait. I’ve been testing their Movement Short during my workouts in 100°+ F weather, and they have been great.

Material

These are 100% polyester and come in at a feather weight of 94gsm. Western Rise has also applied a DWR coating to them, which gives a nice bit of water repellence to the setup. While these shorts have no spandex built in, Western Rise does note that they have mechanical stretch. In my experience when companies say this, you can expect very little stretch, but on the movement shorts I was surprised to learn there was no spandex in the material — because they do have stretch. Albeit very firm stretch, they do stretch.

The overall hand feel on this is fantastic. The shorts feel smooth but a little soft to the touch and I really like the material.

Fit & Style

These are workout/athletic shorts, so we can skip over the style portion this go round. Instead, the fit on these is fantastic.

I got my standard large size and they fit really well. Snug enough that I don’t need to use the drawstring, even with a phone in my pocket, while also not feeling too tight at any point. My thighs have ample room to freely move and breathe, while the leg openings are not so large that you risk any ‘exposure’. Which is not important in the likeliness of it happening so much as the mental security it gives for people used to wearing a short with a longer inseam. At 7” this is a shorter inseam which helps to keep you cool, and give you full range of motion.

This is also shorter than many guys are comfortable wearing. Personally I think these are cut really nicely and fit well.

Performance

I tested these during my normal Ruck style workouts, in 95°F+ temperatures with the humidity soaring. In other words: I wore these working hard in the hottest climate I can safely handle. They performed extremely well, better than any shorts I have ever tested before.

They dry really fast, and they never seem to collect moisture. The few drops water streaming from my face when taking a drink never stayed on the shorts, and in fact no matter the sweat coming off my body, the shorts themselves never looked sweaty and gross.

They also come out of the washer almost wrinkle free and ready to go (what you see in the pics is the shorts after they spent the night wadded up in a ball in the corner of my backpack). The front pockets work well and don’t reduce the breathability of the shorts at all. The added zippered pocket on the left side is a nice add, especially for those not working out with a backpack to store their stuff.

Lastly, as you might expect given the material, these shorts weigh nothing. They are surprisingly light weight, and really I think my boxer shorts weigh more than these. It’s impressive.

Overall

I love these shorts. Not only are they going to be my go to shorts for active use, but I see no reason not to always pack them in my bag when (if) I travel again. They perform great, and get by in a pinch as a swimsuit, and take up no room while adding essentially no weight.

Highly recommended.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Western Rise Movement Short

Nau Kanab Short Sleeve T-Shirt

Nau’s mission is to “make the world’s most sustainable performance wear”. When I saw their Kanab Short Sleeve T-Shirt on clearance last year and saw that it was made from a majority hemp blend, I had to give it a try.

The shirt has become a favorite over the last year, so I thought it was time for a review.

Material

The material (along with the whole Kanab line) is a jersey knit 55% hemp, 45% organic cotton. Some contrasting yarn gives the shirt a great heathered texture, and close-up it almost has micro stripes. To the eye, it has a slub cotton texture and to the hand it is substantial and slightly rough. With wear and washing, the fabric has broken in and softened nicely.

One thing I love about hemp fabrics is the weight while still being breathable. This fabric is no exception. The weight gives it a great drape and keeps it from clinging to your body like merino and synthetics can do.

Performance

This is definitely a performance t-shirt.

The breathability is excellent. The knit is slightly more open than what you typically find in a cotton or merino tee. I always see this in blends like this, I’m guessing it is because the hemp fibers are larger in diameter and rougher than a usual cotton or wool fiber. Even on the hottest days, I’ve remained comfortable.

While it doesn’t manage moisture like a synthetic, I find it more comfortable than merino when sweating a lot. While it does tend to hold a similar amount of moisture, it feels less heavy because the fabric is more substantial. I also find that it does a better job at holding that moisture away from your skin.

When it comes to odor-resistance, I can get 3-4 days between wears. This is quite impressive considering there is no odor treatment, and is a testament to hemp as another fiber to look out for.

Fit & Style

The fit here is a standard straight cut. To be noted is the size chart, as I am happy with the size L when I typically take an XL (with the exception of brands like Patagonia).

Style is perfect for an all-around casual t-shirt. The length sits right at that perfect middle ground for an everyday t-shirt that could be dressed up a bit (thanks to the drape and texture).

Overall

The Nau Kanab Short Sleeve T-Shirt is a great example of how performant a hemp-dominant blend can be without getting too rough from the hemp, and shows that it can be a merino alternative.

Hemp is also a great, sustainable option for clothing. It adds nutrients to the soil, so it needs no synthetic fertilizer. It also needs little to no irrigation. Hemp is also very durable so clothing lasts longer, and when it finally does wear out, it can be composted. While cotton does counteract some of the environmental impact, choosing to blend with organic cotton does help swing the pendulum back in the right direction.

I keep reaching for this shirt. Highly recommended.

NOTE: where possible all product links on this site may earn the site money when you buy using those links.

Nau Kanab Short Sleeve T-Shirt